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Across The Fence: Time for a change

It has been a little more than six years since this column "Across the Fence" was first printed in the fledgling newspaper, The Gering Citizen. Since that first column more than 300 pieces have...

 

Across The Fence: Simply October

I should probably not admit this, but it is already 10 minutes to noon on Monday, Oct. 26. So what is the significance of that? I have a semi-firm deadline of 1 p.m. to get this column submitted, and...

 

Across The Fence: Final Days of the Nez Perce War

The battle at Big Hole was a devastating loss for the Nez Perce. They had been unprepared for Colonel John Gibbon's surprise attack believing, as Looking Glass had assured, that by leaving Idaho...

 

Across The Fence: The Nez Perce War of 1877, Part II

In 1877, the Commanding General of the U.S. Army was William Tecumseh Sherman, whose policy on pacification of the Native Americans focused more on conquest than compromise. Following Custer's defeat...

 

Across The Fence: Thunder Rolling Down the Mountain, Part I

In the fall of 1805, Lewis and Clark arrived on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains where they encountered the Nez Perce Indians and found them to be friendly and exceptionally hospitable. In fac...

 

Across The Fence: The Solomon River Stampede

I have often tried to stop a spooked cow from high tailing across the pasture in a direction opposite of that which I intended. This maneuver has often resulted in a cross-pasture race between horse...

 

Across The Fence: A gathering of warriors at Arikaree Fork

A few miles east of present day Haigler, Neb., the north fork of the Republican River intercepts the smaller tributary of the Arikaree River as it flows northeasterly from Colorado. The Arikaree fork...

 

Across The Fence: The Butterfield Overland Mail

On the Sept., 15, 1858 the newly formed Butterfield Overland Mail Company sent its first Concord stages on their inaugural journey across the U.S. One stage left Saint Louis, Mo., and another left...

 

Across The Fence - Welcome to Van Tassell: Population 15

On a recent trip to Rushville, where Deb and I frequently travel to visit her mother, we decided to take a different course from the usual Scottsbluff to Alliance to Hay Springs route. Heading west...

 

Across The Fence: Edmund Guerrier: Custer's scout in 1867

Edmund Gasseau Choteau Guerrier was born in a Cheyenne Indian village along the Smoky Hill River, when what would become Kansas Territory was then known as a portion of the vast Louisiana Purchase....

 

Across The Fence: 'Medicine Bill' has plenty of mystery

William Averill Comstock – sometimes called "Buffalo Bill" and frequently referred to as "Medicine Bill" – was said to be a half-breed of Cheyenne and white ancestry. Others would claim that he ha...

 

Across The Fence: Old Julesburg brought plenty of 'new' to the area

Tucked neatly in the crook of Nebraska's Panhandle, Sedgwick (Colo.) County has bragging rights to the only two Pony Express stations in the state. Following the southern banks of the South Platte Riv...

 

Across The Fence: Buffalo Baron, Charles Rath

On July 30, 1902, Charles Rath, the son of Johann Christian and Philomene Bertha Rath, died at the home of his sister and brother-in-law in Los Angeles. His headstone in the Rosedale Cemetery is...

 

Across The Fence: Relay race to Roseburg, Ore.

In 1955, the world as we knew it was changing and changing fast. The nation's need for speed, horsepower and independence was reflected in Chevy's '55 Bel Air and the classic Nomad wagon. Ford motor...

 

Across The Fence: C.B. Irwin: Wyoming's 'Giant Cowboy'

Charles Burton Irwin was a giant of a man. In 1987, Tad Lucas, world famous champion cowgirl bronc rider said of C.B. Irwin, "Fat as he was, he could really ride. He used to run this old yellow horse...

 

Across The Fence: Re-writing Wyoming's history

On July 10, 1890, Wyoming Territory was granted statehood and became the 44th state to join the ranks of the U.S. Last weekend in Cheyenne, Wyo., a celebration of those 125 years was commemorated with...

 

Across The Fence: Three women are queens in the world of rodeo

Over the years it has become somewhat of a tradition to celebrate Father's Day at the Grover Rodeo. The rodeo in that small northern Colorado town has been an annual event since the early 1920s and at...

 

Across The Fence: The Long Hard Pull

I know that I'm not the only person who, from childhood, developed a lasting love of all things "railroad." At the top of that list comes the old steam locomotives that make my pulse pound a little...

 

An old barn and new memories

It was nearly two years ago when our oldest daughter and son-in-law announced their move to a small ranch in Routt County, Colo. The ranch is an addition to their Larimer County ranch and will...

 

Across The Fence: Massacre Canyon

On July 2, 1873, a hunting party of Pawnee left their reservation near Genoa, Neb., on the Loup River. It was customary for the Pawnee to mount an organized buffalo hunt in the early summer and late...

 

Across The Fence: Charley Nebo, a cowboy just passin' through

The original of the Charley Nebo photograph belongs to historian Robert G. McCubbin and in a handwritten script across the top is titled: "The Genuine Cowboy Captured Alive." Charley Nebo is the...

 

Across The Fence: Fort Sanders, a forgotten fort on the U.P. line

As the Union Pacific Railroad stretched its ribbon of steel across the Great Plains, "End of Track" towns sprang up faster than a desert flower after a spring rain. Although not near as pleasing to...

 

Across The Fence: Salt Creek Massacre, May 18, 1871

"When a white army battles Indians and wins, it is called a great victory, but if they lose it is called a massacre." – Chiksika, Shawnee. In 1871, Henry Warren had contracted with the U.S. Army to...

 

Across The Fence: From Wounded Knee to the Land of Oz

Lyman Frank Baum, born May 15, 1856, was the seventh of nine children born to Benjamin Ward and Cynthia Ann Baum. Frank, as he preferred to be known, was one of the five children who survived to...

 

Across The Fence: Phileas Fogg gets bested by a girl

One hundred and fifty years ago, on the fifth day of May, 1865, Judge Michael Cochran and his wife Mary Jane celebrated the birth of a daughter. Born in Cochran Mills, Penn., (the town was named for...

 

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