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Cancer center remains closed following last week's storm

Treatment for Sidney patients will continue at Regional West during clean up

 


Cancer patients in Sidney who need radiation treatment have to travel to receive it, at least for the time being.

Sidney's Dorwart Cancer Center closed last week due to storm damage and won't open until the beginning of next week at the earliest, according to Jonanne Krieg, marketing specialist at Regional West Medical Center.

Due to water damage during the Sept. 9 storm, patients of the Dorwart Cancer Care Center will have to travel to Scottsbluff to receive radiation treatments. The storm caused significant water damage to the facility. Power was down at the facility into last Tuesday as well.

“We want to assure our patients in Sidney that they will be able to continue their radiation therapy at the Cancer Treatment Center in Scottsbluff,” said Jeff Kriewald, Regional West Director of Cancer Services. “We regret that they will have to drive to Scottsbluff, but they will receive the treatment they need at the Cancer Treatment Center in Scottsbluff for as long as necessary."

The Dorwart Cancer Care Center is currently closed for clean-up and repairs. Staff contacted patients to reschedule their treatment at the Cancer Treatment Center.

"The situation right now is it's still closed," Krieg said. "They're continuing to clean and it's taking a little longer than anticipated."

Tests later this week will confirm whether or not the outpatient portion of the center will be safe to open by Sept. 23. Those scheduled to have radiation therapy at the center will have to travel to Scottsbluff for at least the next month, Krieg added.

Water damage due to flooding was fairly extensive at the center, she said.

"It crept pretty far in," Krieg added.

The main hallway of the facility was completely flooded, as well as many of the rooms directly off that passage. All the carpet and much of the dry wall in this area had to be replaced following the damage. Around one quarter of the building had some amount of flooding, according to Krieg.

No one knows what sorts of contaminants might have been in the dirty flood water, so the building must be tested to make sure that no contagions or mold are present in the building before workers or patients with compromised immune systems return to the facility.

"We have to make sure there isn't anything that could impact the immune system," Krieg said.

A few Sidney patients are staying in Scottsbluff while they undergo treatment, a few are making the drive to Scottsbluff, while others are delaying treatment for the moment. All patients in need of treatment will receive it, Krieg said. Once radiation is started, it needs to continue as scheduled, so this is why some chose to delay the start.

"We want to get the center opened, but our primary concern is patient safety," Krieg said.

Radiation treatment involves some very expensive equipment and those at the center want to ensure it's in proper working order before going back into business.

"We're doing everything we can to accommodate the patients," Krieg said.

Caitlin Sievers

Hed: Cancer center remains closed following last week's storm

Dek: Treatment for Sidney patients will continue at Regional West during clean up

Cancer patients in Sidney who need radiation treatment have to travel to receive it, at least for the time being.

Sidney's Dorwart Cancer Center closed last week due to storm damage and won't open until the beginning of next week at the earliest, according to Jonanne Krieg, marketing specialist at Regional West Medical Center.

Due to water damage during the Sept. 9 storm, patients of the Dorwart Cancer Care Center will have to travel to Scottsbluff to receive radiation treatments. The storm caused significant water damage to the facility. Power was down at the facility into last Tuesday as well.

“We want to assure our patients in Sidney that they will be able to continue their radiation therapy at the Cancer Treatment Center in Scottsbluff,” said Jeff Kriewald, Regional West Director of Cancer Services. “We regret that they will have to drive to Scottsbluff, but they will receive the treatment they need at the Cancer Treatment Center in Scottsbluff for as long as necessary."

The Dorwart Cancer Care Center is currently closed for clean-up and repairs. Staff contacted patients to reschedule their treatment at the Cancer Treatment Center.

"The situation right now is it's still closed," Krieg said. "They're continuing to clean and it's taking a little longer than anticipated."

Tests later this week will confirm whether or not the outpatient portion of the center will be safe to open by Sept. 23. Those scheduled to have radiation therapy at the center will have to travel to Scottsbluff for at least the next month, Krieg added.

Water damage due to flooding was fairly extensive at the center, she said.

"It crept pretty far in," Krieg added.

The main hallway of the facility was completely flooded, as well as many of the rooms directly off that passage. All the carpet and much of the dry wall in this area had to be replaced following the damage. Around one quarter of the building had some amount of flooding, according to Krieg.

No one knows what sorts of contaminants might have been in the dirty flood water, so the building must be tested to make sure that no contagions or mold are present in the building before workers or patients with compromised immune systems return to the facility.

"We have to make sure there isn't anything that could impact the immune system," Krieg said.

A few Sidney patients are staying in Scottsbluff while they undergo treatment, a few are making the drive to Scottsbluff, while others are delaying treatment for the moment. All patients in need of treatment will receive it, Krieg said. Once radiation is started, it needs to continue as scheduled, so this is why some chose to delay the start.

"We want to get the center opened, but our primary concern is patient safety," Krieg said.

Radiation treatment involves some very expensive equipment and those at the center want to ensure it's in proper working order before going back into business.

"We're doing everything we can to accommodate the patients," Krieg said.

 

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